Prof. Zvi Vogel

Prof. Zvi Vogel

Chairman of the Department of Neurobiology, Weizmann Institute of Science
Israel

Dr. Vogel performed his M.Sc. studies at the Department of Biochemistry of the Hebrew University and his Ph.D. at the Weizmann Institute of Science. Between 1971 and 1973 he performed his post-doc studies at the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD) in the Laboratory of the Nobel Prize laureate Dr. Marshall Nirenberg. It was during this period that he was exposed to the field of Neurobiology and in particular to the study of receptor-neurotransmitter interactions in the nervous system. Dr. Vogel got his tenure as Associate Professor at the Weizmann Institute in 1979 and became Full Professor in 1995. Between 2001 and 2004 he served as the Chairman of the Department of Neurobiology at the Weizmann Institute. Currently, he is a Professor Emeritus at the Weizmann Institute of science and is serving as the Head of the Adelson Center for the Biology of Addictive Diseases at Tel-Aviv University.

Dr. Vogel published more than 170 scientific manuscripts. His Scientific work focuses mainly on the interaction of drugs of abuse with their receptors (e.g., the opioid and cannabinoid receptors) as well as the identification and characterization of the endogenous ligands to these receptors. During the last 25 years most of the efforts of his laboratory were devoted to the newly emerging cannabinoid field. He had a major role in the identification and characterization of the endogenous cannabinoid ligands (anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol) as well as in revealing the pharmacological and physiological effects of several of the phytocannabinoids (the active materials present in Cannabis). Among other findings, his group has recently shown that cannabidiol (one of the major phytocannabinoids) as well as several other cannabinoids and their derivatives have anti-inflammatory properties and thus inhibit pathogenic T cells and ameliorate the multiple sclerosis-like disease in both animal and tissue culture models.